FAQ: What Optic Does The Marine Corps Use?

What brand of optics does the military use?

Since the ACOG® became the Official Rifle Combat Optic (RCO) of the US Marine Corps in 2004, Trijicon has been honored with many more U.S. Military partnerships—including the RMR® Type 2 being selected as the official USSOCOM Miniature Aiming System Day Optics Program.

What is the Marine Corps vision?

PROMOTE PEACE AND STABILITY AND TO DEFEAT OUR NATION’S FOES.”

What optic does the US Army use on M4?

The United States Army, Air Force and Marine Corps field the Trijicon TA31RCO ACOG, a 4× magnification model with a 32mm objective lens (4×32), with specially designed ballistic compensating reticles that are fiber optic & tritium illuminated, for the M4 carbine and M16A4 rifle.

Do Special Forces use ACOG?

Designed to the exact specifications of the US Special Operations Command for use by elite US forces, the Trijicon ACOG TA01NSN is Trijicon’s most popular ACOG. The ranging reticle allows for bullet drop compensation out to 600 meters without any manual adjustments.

What magnification do snipers use?

They are fixed, 10-power scopes with a 32mm objective lens. This means that they are capable of magnifying an image to 10 times its size. The sniper uses the wire reticule with mil dots to range and sight the target.

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Is every Marine a rifleman?

The 29th Commandant of the Marine Corps, General Alfred M. Gray Jr., once stated, “ Every Marine is, first and foremost, a rifleman. All other conditions are secondary.” The problem here is that being a skilled shooter doesn’t equate to knowing how to handle the job of an infantry rifleman.

Are Marines tougher than soldiers?

The Marine Corps members are called marines, not soldiers, and they typically have to go through much more intense basic training than those in the Army do, creating a reputation for being some of the toughest and most highly trained fighters.

What does SOG stand for Military?

The Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, Studies and Observations Group (MACV-SOG) was activated, January 24, 1964, to function as a joint special operations task force. Commanded by a U.S. Army Special Forces colonel, MACV-SOG was a subcomponent of MACV.

Where do you aim with ACOG?

The TA33 ACOG scope is designed to be zeroed at 100 meters using the tip of the Chevron reticle as the point of aim/point of impact (POA/POI). In order for the bullet drop compensator to work correctly, a 100 meter zero should be verified. The 100 meter zero allows the BDC reticle to be used effectively to 600 meters.

Why is it called ACOG?

A light, compact riflescope could benefit American troops. However, a light, compact, tough-as-nails riflescope could be a game-changer. Glyn named his concept the Advanced Combat Optical Gunsight (ACOG), and his goal was to strengthen it from the very beginning.

Is ACOG standard issue?

Yes it is. It’s the standard issue ACOG for the US Army.

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What sights do special forces use?

Special Forces troops carry the M4 and utilize the new SOPMOD 2 package, which includes the EO Tech 553 holographic reflex site, LA-5 infrared laser, foregrip, the M3X visible bright light (tactical light) and associated accessories.

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